Peter Reynolds

The life and times of Peter Reynolds

Posts Tagged ‘cannabis

IPSO Complaint Against The Sunday Telegraph – “Our Police Have Gone To Pot”.

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ipso logoIPSO

Your complaint

Type of complaint: Material published in a newspaper or magazine
Type of complaint: Material published in a newspaper or magazine website
Date story was published: Sunday 26 July, 2015
Publication: The Sunday Telegraph
URL of article (if appropriate): http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/crime/11763228/Our-police-have-gone-to-pot.html
Publication has been contacted?: No
Publication headline: Our police have gone to pot

How the Code has been breached

Clauses breached
Clause 1 (Accuracy)
1. First sentence: “Despite the medical evidence that cannabis causes psychosis, Durham police have announced that they will no longer prosecute those growing ‘€œsmall quantities‒ for personal consumption.”This is factually inaccurate. There is no medical evidence that cannabis causes psychosis. All the studies on the subject are very clear that no causative link can be shown.

2. Para 2 first sentence: “Many ministers admit having used illegal substances; so this policy of allowing the nation to rot its brains and become a danger to everyone else has yet to be countermanded.”

This is factually inaccurate. There is no evidence that cannabis ‘rots the brain’. In fact, precisely the opposite is true. Many studies demonstrate that cannabis is neuroprotective and helps to protect the brain against external injury, concussion and stroke. There is also no evidence that cannabis use causes anyone to “become a danger to everyone else”.

About you

Name: Mr Peter Reynolds

Written by Peter Reynolds

July 27, 2015 at 2:00 pm

IPSO Complaint Against The Times – “We’€™d Be Off Our Heads To Tolerate Cannabis”.

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ipso logoIPSO

Your complaint

Type of complaint: Material published in a newspaper or magazine
Type of complaint: Material published in a newspaper or magazine website
Date story was published: Monday 27 July, 2015
Publication: The Times
URL of article (if appropriate): http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/opinion/columnists/article4508934.ece
Publication has been contacted?: No
Publication headline: We’€™d be off our heads to tolerate cannabis

How the Code has been breached

Clauses breached
Clause 1 (Accuracy) Although this is an opinion piece it makes a number of factual assertions that are false and unsupported by any evidence.

1. Subhead: “Police laxity has led to more young pot-heads and rising levels of psychosis and addiction” This is factually incorrect. There are now fewer people of all ages using cannabis.

2. Para 3 “Far from a harsh approach, it is laxity that has boosted the number of young pot-heads. This is bad for multiple reasons. Cannabis itself is extremely dangerous. It impairs memory, cripples judgment and the ability to learn. In high doses it can cause addiction, paranoia and psychosis and provoke schizophrenia.”

Factually incorrect. The “number of young pot-heads” has declined not been “boosted”. There is no evidence that cannabis is “extremely dangerous”. There is no evidence that cannabis causes psychosis.

3. Para 7 “Then they claimed Portugal‒s drug liberalisation had caused drug use to tumble. This was untrue; the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction showed that drug use there had increased.”

Factually incorrect, the EMCDDA and all sources show that drug use has declined in Portugal since decriminalisation

4. Para 10 “Although there is no scientific evidence for definitive benefit from medicinal cannabis, the US has now legalised this in 23 states”

Factually incorrect, there is a vast quantity of peer-reviewed, published scientific evidence demonstrating the efficacy and safety of medicinal cannabis.

These are very serious inaccuracies which Ms Phillips publishes on a regular basis in the full knowledge that they are untrue. Any newspaper which knowingly publishes lies and falsehoods to deceive its readers should be subject to the strongest possible sanctions including a financial penalty. Such dishonest publications must be dealt with firmly, sufficient to deter repetition.

About you

Name: Mr Peter Reynolds

Written by Peter Reynolds

July 27, 2015 at 1:35 pm

CLEAR Sets The Pace In The Social Media Cannabis Campaign.

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CLEAR Facebook Insights And Comparison With Similar Pages, 20th July 2015.

CLEAR Facebook Insights And Comparison With Similar Pages, 20th July 2015.

Since the spring of 2011, through Facebook and Twitter, CLEAR has provided a newsfeed on cannabis and drugs policy that informs and energises the campaign.

The CLEAR Daily News, available on email subscription here, summarises all of each day’s posts on social media. It provides a quick way to catch up and a record of events across the world in the campaign for cannabis law reform and a more intelligent, evidence-based approach to drugs policy.

A major overhaul of the CLEAR website has automated much of the process of compiling and distributing the Daily News. However, it still depends on the CLEAR team of five or six admins to find and post the news on a continuous basis 365 days a year between 7.00 am and midnight, UK time.

Written by Peter Reynolds

July 21, 2015 at 11:14 am

Shocking BBC Report On Herbal Products Highlights Problems With Cannabis Regulation.

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thr

It seems that unless you choose a herbal product with a THR mark you can have no certainty at all about what you are buying.

An excellent report on the BBC’s ‘Trust Me I’m A Doctor‘, reveals that the industry is rife with confidence tricksters, fraudsters and probably some well-meaning incompetents. How can you know what you’re getting in a herbal product?  This has major implications for the medicinal use of cannabis and the businesses that will be needed to supply the product when it is legally available.

The THR mark is Traditional Herbal Registration as regulated by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). It costs between £600 to £8000 to apply but that’s only if you’re claiming “the medicine is used for minor health conditions where medical supervision is not required (eg a cold).” If you want to claim anything more you have to apply for a marketing authorisation when fees are in excess of £100,000, plus the cost of clinical trials or evidence of your claims and your product’s safety.

This is probably the biggest single problem facing the campaign for medicinal cannabis.  We are a round peg which doesn’t fit into any of the government’s square holes.

If we argue for cannabis as medicine, we challenge the reductionist, allopathic establishment which says that medicines are single molecules with directly quantifiable, predictable and consistent results.  We cannot fit into the government’s square holes without the sort of approach taken by GW Pharmaceuticals at a cost of tens of millions in development.

That is why the campaign has to focus on removing cannabis from schedule 1, so that doctors may prescribe it as they see fit.  Some doctors are ready to do so (a few brave individuals already are prescribing) but it will require a huge campaign to educate others as to why and how to prescribe – and it will not be possible to make any medical claims in that campaign!

The model of cannabis as medicine with different strains providing different therapeutic value just doesn’t fit within any concept of medicine in the UK.  That’s like a triangular peg in a square hole.

So perhaps there is little point in an unwinnable campaign to legalise such a drug as medicine when its use is already tarnished by years of propaganda and media scaremongering?  It may be a hopeless cause and seeking a more general decriminalisation of the plant might be a wiser course.

This is a question that seems to be unique to the UK.  Other jurisdictions, such as the US states, have achieved reform through radical democracy which we do not enjoy in Britain. Canadians have used their courts to enforce access to cannabis as a fundamental human right. Other European countries just seem to be more flexible, intelligent and sympathetic to patients.

On the other hand, it does seem that the MHRA’s THR scheme works and you know what you are getting when you buy a herbal medicine.  Otherwise charlatans and confidence tricksters would prevail.

These issues concern not only the campaign for medicinal cannabis but for cannabis law reform as a whole.  Until we get to grips with them and develop a coherent approach we may find the UK continues to lag behind the rest of the world.

Promoting ‘Growing Your Own’ Has No Place In The Campaign For Medicinal Cannabis.

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cannabis scum

“I’s my rights innit?  I can grow me own medicine carn’I?  I’m too sick to work. I can save the NHS millions. Le’s have anuvver spliff.”

Face it, this is exactly how too many people in Britain see medicinal cannabis users. It’s not true. It’s not fair. It’s unjust. Almost everything about it is wrong. The one thing that’s right – is that it’s a stereotype some people keep on reinforcing.

So we have to educate and inform those who have the power to change the law. We also have to adjust our aims and our expectations to be realistic in the eyes of those we need to persuade. It’s a big enough leap to convince people that cannabis can be a safe and effective medicine. In 2015, in the UK, the idea that we are going to convince politicians and medical policymakers that we “grow our own medicine” is fantasy. It is not going to happen.

Of course, many people have to grow their own at present because they have no choice.  Particularly now that NICE have recommended against Sativex there is, for most people, no other option.

Effective campaigning is about focus, ruthless focus on a precise target. For medicinal cannabis, wider issues of human rights, individuality, ecology, lifestyle,  – these are irrelevant. Do those some other time. Real and effective campaigning is like a job interview. You behave and dress in a way you believe will win you credit with your your prospective employer. That’s what we must do if we want to persuade people and change minds.

So the image of medicinal cannabis users we present is crucial. When government ministers see that we are ordinary, decent, hardworking people with families, careers, homes, pets, elderly relatives that we care about  – and all we are trying to do is improve our health – that’s what makes the difference.

Norman Baker and Lara Smith.

Norman Baker and Lara Smith.

Believe me, I have seen it with my own eyes. When we first met Norman Baker last year, he was far from convinced about medicinal cannabis. He was pretty dubious about it in fact, as are many. He said initially there was only “limited evidence”. Only when he met some people and listened to their stories did he become open to considering the evidence that we offered. I swear, I actually watched his mind changing, particularly as he listened to Lara Smith explain how she copes with constant pain and bringing up three young children.

Later, Norman told me that when he spoke to Theresa May about it, she simply didn’t understand.  She couldn’t conceive that these scumbag potheads and druggies have anything to do with the consumption of a therapeutic and beneficial plant.

It is a step too far to try and include GYO in the campaign for medicinal cannabis. We are simply laughed at. No one suggests growing opium poppies or willow trees or deadly nightshade to use as medicine. It undermines all the effort to provide good scientific evidence and a responsible, coherent argument. GYO cannot provide the standards of quality, consistency, safety (free from mould, fertiliser and pesticide residues, etc) that other medicines have to comply with.

Don’t get me wrong.  I’m all for GYO but I’m a weirdo, one of those eccentrics who also grows his own tomatoes, potatoes and other vegetables.  Most people prefer to buy them in Sainsbury’s and that’s exactly how it will be when cannabis is finally legalised.  Most people will prefer it in a nice plastic tray with a film wrapper and a label telling them exactly what they are getting.

GYO must wait for wider decriminalisation or legalisation.  Bringing it into the argument for permitting medicinal use is the cannabis campaign shooting itself in the foot – yet again!

Written by Peter Reynolds

July 5, 2015 at 2:01 pm

The Minister For Government Policy On The Strange Case Of Medicinal Cannabis.

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Oliver Letwin MP

Oliver Letwin MP

Oliver Letwin MP is, according to The Independent, “probably the most powerful person in the government after the Prime Minister and Chancellor”.

He is the Cabinet Office minister with responsibility for the implementation of government policy.  He holds the ancient title of Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster.  He is a member of 13 of the 14 Cabinet committees and chair of three of them, more than anyone other than Cameron.  He is now chair of the most powerful of them, the Home Affairs committee, which Theresa May would have expected to chair and he also sits on nine of the 10 new “Implementation Taskforces”. Cameron is said to have told him “I need you with me every day”.

An extraordinarily powerful and influential man.  I met with him last week to put the case for reform of policy on medicinal cannabis. He listened attentively, asked searching questions, evidently has a good understanding of science and medicines regulation.  In the end, he agreed to ask Jeremy Hunt, Secretary of State for Health, to meet with me and a delegation of medicinal cannabis users.  We agreed that the Home Office is no longer the route to reform.  The word is that if the Department of Health calls for a new policy then the Home Office will comply.  Theresa May has been sidelined on this issue.  Her minister of state for drugs policy, Mike Penning, seems to be nothing but a mouthpiece for Home Office civil servants.  Quite properly and at last, medicinal cannabis is being seen as a health issue and not one of law enforcement or criminal justice.

So we could not have a more important opportunity.  Mr Letwin has now confirmed to me in writing that he will “..investigate the question of prescription cannabis for relief of medical conditions.  I will start the process of talking to people in MHRA, Public Health England and so forth to try to get a sense of the pros and cons.”

Although he has not yet indicated to me that he supports our cause, he seemed particularly perplexed that cannabis is a schedule 1 drug whereas heroin is schedule 2 and may be prescribed by a doctor.  It is clear that he recognises there is medicinal value in cannabis.

To have Oliver Letwin pursuing our cause through government is great progress.  Although the loss of our Liberal Democrat allies has been a setback, it seems that the issue of medicinal cannabis has momentum. We need to keep on keeping on.  Nothing works better than getting in front of government minsters and showing them that most people who use medicinal cannabis are responsible members of society, doing the best they can to contribute, holding down a job where possible, looking after their families and trying to maintain their health.

I sense that the optimism we felt before the election was not misplaced.  Engaging with government, turning away from irresponsible protest and putting our arguments forward with courtesy and evidence is what will achieve our goal.

Written by Peter Reynolds

July 3, 2015 at 3:41 pm

How You Can Help The Campaign For Medicinal Cannabis.

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Using the Volcano vapouriser with medicinal cannabis

Using The Volcano Vapouriser With Medicinal Cannabis

CLEAR is launching a new recruitment drive for its Medicinal Cannabis Users Panel.  If you use cannabis as medicine, joining the panel is the most effective thing you can do both to advance the campaign and, in some instances, gain legitimate access to prescribed Bedrocan medicinal cannabis.

The panel has proved itself to be the most effective campaigning method ever used in the UK.  As a direct result of the efforts of panel members, in the last two years there have been more meetings with government minsters, officials and senior MPs than the whole campaign has managed in the last 50 years.

You must be a member of CLEAR to join the panel, then you complete a detailed questionnaire providing information on your condition(s) and how cannabis helps. Each applicant is then interviewed by telephone to develop an individual plan.  This will depend on a number of factors, such as your relationship with your doctor, your MP, how much time you have available and whether you are prepared to tell your story to the media.

If your doctor is prepared to help, there is now an established route to getting medicinal cannabis prescribed and legally imported into the UK.  CLEAR has developed this process through experience working with doctors, MPs, the Home Office and the Border Force.  We also have crucial support from the All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Drug Policy Reform and a number of members of the House of Lords.  This is on a private prescription basis only.  The prescription has to be very carefully written, using exactly the correct wording and, to begin with, you will have to travel to Holland in person to have the prescription dispensed at a pharmacy.  Thereafter it may be possible to have repeat prescriptions sent through the post.

Bedrocan Products

Bedrocan Products

Bedrocan is the Dutch government’s official producer of medicinal cannabis.  Five different varieties are available at a cost of approximately seven to eight euros per gram. See full details of the different products here.

All panel members are guided in how to approach their doctor and MP.  Initial contact should be made by letter or email but then it is important to meet your doctor and MP face to face and provide them with high quality scientific evidence to support your case.  CLEAR will offer guidance and help at every stage.  If you wish then a member of our executive committee will accompany you to meetings to help you present your case.  Whether or not your doctor is prepared to write a prescription for you, we aim to continue leading delegations of medicinal users to meet ministers.  We have seen again and again what an impact this can have.  When senior politicians who have no experience  of medicinal cannabis meet genuine, decent, ordinary people with families and careers who tell their story with sincerity and conviction, it has an enormous impact.

If you live in the UK and are interested in joining the panel, please email a brief explanation of your interest to: meduserspanel@clear-uk.org

Please do not go into great detail at this stage. Applications should be no more than 200 words. We will respond to you with a questionnaire within seven to 10 days.

MUP process

Written by Peter Reynolds

June 30, 2015 at 12:31 pm

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