Peter Reynolds

The life and times of Peter Reynolds

Americans And Their Guns. The Death Of A Great Civilisation.

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Misguided, Dangerous and Deluded

Remind me never to discuss guns with Americans again.  There is a strand of opinion there that is so powerful it has subverted the kind, human instinct of millions of people.

The simple fact is that the easy availability of guns in America has led directly to a continuing tragedy of epic proportions: gun violence and murders at a frequency that exceeds any other place on our planet.  That anyone seeks to defend this appalling truth or argue that the present situation should continue is beyond reason.

I have engaged in shooting sports for more than 40 years, so I am not anti-gun but if the choice is between the carnage caused by the madness of the NRA and my freedom to continue clay and game shooting, then it is an easy decision. Guns must be strictly and rigorously controlled.

1. You have to prove legitimate use for owning a gun
2. Psychological and medical stability certified by a doctor
3. Limited magazine capacity
4. Limited ammunition quantity

If America does not grasp this nettle then it is doomed .

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Written by Peter Reynolds

October 3, 2017 at 8:52 pm

Posted in Biography, Politics

Royal College Of General Practitioners. Draft Council Paper – Cannabis For Specified Medical Indications.

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This is the document presented to the Council of the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) on 22nd September 2017.  The proposal was approved.

 

 

 

APPG: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0c_8hkDJu0DRnBfdGRDRXBROUU/view
Barnes: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0c_8hkDJu0DUDZMUzhoY1RqMG8/view
MS Society (2017) Cannabis and MS: The Role of Cannabis in Treating MS Symptoms

Cannabis for Specified Medical Indications

Introduction

In the past year, there has been significant interest in the issue of legalisation of cannabis for medical purposes. The All Party Parliamentary Group on Drug Policy Reform made a recommendation in October 2016 that cannabis should be legalised for specific medical indications (https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0c_8hkDJu0DRnBfdGRDRXBROUU/view). An accompanying report (the Barnes report:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0c_8hkDJu0DUDZMUzhoY1RqMG8/view) summarised the current evidence for medicinal use and outlined the known side effects. This proposal now has all party support with over 100 MPs backing the plan.

Other countries have recently legalised, or are about to legalise, medical cannabis, including over half of the US states, Germany, Canada, Australia and Ireland, amongst several others. It has been estimated that over 1 million people use cannabis for medical reasons in the UK on a regular basis. A recent poll showed 68% of the public supported medical usage and only 12% were actively against (REF). A similar number of GPs also supported the concept in a poll published alongside the APPG report.

Some forms of cannabis are legally available, including Sativex for MS-associated spasticity. An important component of natural cannabis, Cannabidiol (CBD), is also legally available without prescription through health food outlets.

It is likely that GPs will be asked, by those with a variety of chronic conditions, for advice on the use of cannabis and related products. It is proposed that the RCGP works with a number of other organisations (including the MS Society) to produce a GP information booklet which offers balanced and reasonable advice on the appropriate use of cannabis, bearing in mind of course, that natural cannabis and the main psychoactive component, Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), remain generally illegal.

The MS Society has recently reviewed its position on cannabis use as a medicinal treatment for people with MS (MS Society, 2017). The society believes that there is now enough evidence to assert that cannabis for medicinal use, if managed properly, could benefit around 10,000 people who suffer from pain and spasticity as a result of multiple sclerosis.

They want to see all licensed treatments derived from cannabis made available to people who need them. But until that happens they are calling on the UK government to legalise cannabis for medicinal use to treat pain and spasticity in MS, when other treatments have not worked. They believe that people should be able to access objective information about the potential benefits and side effects of using cannabis for medicinal purposes.

Furthermore, they believe it’s both unfair and against the public interest to prosecute people with MS for using cannabis to treat pain and spasticity, when other treatments have not worked for them (MS Society, 2017).

The Proposal

It is proposed that the RCGP works with a number of other organisations (e.g. MS Society, Newcastle University) to produce a GP information booklet which offers balanced and reasonable advice on the appropriate use of cannabis, bearing in mind of course, that natural cannabis and the main psychoactive component, THC, remain generally illegal.

The aim of the GP information booklet would be to offer balanced and reasonable advice on the appropriate use of cannabis.

The booklet would be short and concise (about 4 pages of A4). It will briefly cover the history of cannabis and outline the natural endocannabinoid system found in all humans. The different forms of cannabis and means of ingestion/inhalation would be outlined. It will also outline the current legal status as a Schedule 1 drug but also highlight the legally available varieties of cannabis (Sativex, Nabilone and CBD).

The medical evidence for different conditions will be given in a balanced way with a reasonable appraisal of existing evidence for those conditions with a good evidence base and for those conditions currently lacking in evidence.

It is important that the side effects will be carefully outlined. This would include the known short-term effects of the psychoactive component as well as a discussion of the potential and actual longer-term effects. This would clearly include the concern around triggering schizophrenia-like syndromes and the risks associated with cognitive problems, driving, dependency.

It will be important that the evidence is presented in a reasoned and reasonable, balanced way without any bias either for or against the legalisation argument.

NM, MB, PR
August 2017

BBC Executive Complaints Unit, Stage 3 Complaint Re: Interview Claiming ‘Cannabis More Harmful Than Heroin’.

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Louisa Philips Kulukundis

CLEAR has submitted a formal complaint to the BBC concerning its broadcast of the interview with Lousia Kulukundis in which she claimed that using heroin was safer than using cannabis.

BBC complaints are outsourced to Capita and are not actually considered by the BBC itself until they reach Stage 3, the ‘Executive Complaints Unit’.

From: Peter Reynolds
Sent: 22 September 2017 17:05
To: ‘ecu@bbc.co.uk’ <ecu@bbc.co.uk>
Subject: Request to review complaint CAS-4563673-ZNGCG0

Dear Sirs,

1. Please review the decision made in respect of this complaint.  The correspondence including complaints and responses at stages 1a and 1b are attached to this email.

2. The complaint concerns an interview with Louisa Kulukundis, a psychotherapist, a member of the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP).  The interview was broadcast as part of ‘Newsbeat Documentary Cannabis:Time for a Change’ which was repeated frequently on the BBC News channel and is available online.  It was also included within the ‘Newsbeat Debate: Cannabis’ also broadcast on the BBC News channel and also available online.

A formal complaint about Ms Kulukundis’ conduct has also been made to the BACP.

During the interview Ms Kulukundis made the statement:

“I would say give me a room full of heroin addicts than skunk addicts. I remember saying to my older son I would prefer you to take heroin than to smoke skunk. There will be generations of kids with severe mental health issues.”

1.The points of complaint raised at 1b that need reconsideration are:

a. In broadcasting these comments which are dangerous, irresponsible and directly contradicted by all scientific and medical evidence, the BBC has acted negligently and endangered the lives of vulnerable, easily-influenced young people at whom this programme was targeted.

b. The relative danger and/or harms of heroin and cannabis cannot be justified as a matter of opinion or of ‘balance’ because they are clearly established scientific fact.

c. It is essential that the BBC should broadcast a correction with equal prominence and repeated as many times as the original programme. The BBC owes a duty of care to its viewers, particularly in the case of programmes for the young.  It must make clear that Ms Kulukundis’ words were incorrect, that heroin is hundreds of times more dangerous than cannabis to both physical and mental health and can lead to death.

Broadcasting this interview breaches the BBC Editorial Guidelines as follows:

a. “…we must give our audiences content made to the highest editorial and ethical standards.  Their trust depends on it.” 1.1

b. “ We must therefore balance our presumption of freedom of expression with our responsibilities…to provide appropriate protection for our audiences from harm.” 1.1

c. “Accuracy  is  not  simply  a  matter  of getting facts right; when necessary, we will weigh relevant facts and information to get at the truth.” 1.2.2

d. “…we  balance  our  right  to broadcast  innovative  and  challenging  content  with  our  responsibility  to  protect the vulnerable from harm…particularly  in  relation  to  the  protection of children.” 1.2.5

e. “We will be rigorous in establishing the truth of the story and well informed when explaining it.” 1.2.6

f. “We will always seek to safeguard the welfare of children and young people…while ensuring their dignity and  their  physical  and  emotional  welfare  is  protected  during  the  making  and broadcast of our output.  Content which might be unsuitable for children will be scheduled appropriately.” 1.2.9

g. “…accuracy  must  be  adequate  and  appropriate  to the  output,  taking  account  of  the  subject  and  nature  of  the  content,  the  likely audience expectation and any signposting that may influence that expectation.” 3.1

h. “Accuracy   is   not   simply   a   matter   of   getting   facts   right… we should check and cross check facts…corroborate claims and allegations made by contributors.” 3.1

i. “The  BBC  must  not  knowingly  and  materially  mislead  its  audiences.    We should  not  distort  known  facts,  present  invented  material  as  fact  or  otherwise undermine our audiences’ trust in our content.” 3.2.3

j. “We should normally acknowledge serious factual errors and correct them quickly, clearly and appropriately.” 3.2.4

k. “ In  all  our  content  we  must  check  and  verify  information,  facts  and documents,  where  required  to  achieve  due accuracy.” 3.4.2

l. “We should not   automatically   assume   that   the   material   is   accurate   and   should   take reasonable  steps,  depending  on  how  it  is  to  be  used  and  if  necessary  to achieve due accuracy, to seek verification.” 3.4.3

m. “We  must  not  knowingly  and  materially  mislead  our  audiences  with  our content.” 3.4.11

n. “We should consider the emotional impact pictures and personal testimony can have on perceptions of risk when not supported by the balance of argument.  If a  contributor’s  view  is  contrary  to  majority  opinion,  the  demands  of  due accuracy and due impartiality may require us to make this clear.” 3.4.21

o. “We should normally acknowledge serious factual errors and correct such mistakes quickly, clearly and appropriately.  Inaccuracy may lead to a complaint of  unfairness.    An  effective  way  of  correcting  a  mistake  is  saying  what  was wrong as well as putting it right.” 3.4.26

p. “When dealing with ‘controversial subjects’…Opinion   should   be   clearly distinguished from fact.” 4.4.7

q. “…when   personal   view   programmes…cover  ‘controversial  subjects’…we should:…retain a respect for factual accuracy.” 4.4.30

r. “The  BBC  must  apply  generally  accepted  standards  so  as  to  provide adequate  protection  for  members  of  the  public  from the  inclusion  of  offensive and harmful material.” 5.2.1

s. “We  must  not  broadcast  material  that  might  seriously  impair  the  physical, mental or moral development of children and young people.” 5.2.2

t. “…deal  with  all  aspects  of  illegal  drug  use…with due accuracy.” 5.4.42

I am happy to provide further information, evidence or detail on any aspect of this complaint.

Yours faithfully,

Peter Reynolds

Written by Peter Reynolds

September 25, 2017 at 12:22 pm

We Should Encourage Peter Hitchens In His Bombastic Ways.

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Peter Hitchens clearly doesn’t realise what a turn off his rude, boorish behaviour is to 90% of people who watch him on TV. Of course, to the small minority who agree with him, it’s very effective rabble rousing just like an Islamist fanatic or a hard right hatemonger.  That’s exactly how he looks to most people and really we should encourage him to do more of the same.

Peter’s performance on BBC Sunday Morning Live followed a pattern all too-familiar to those who understand his tactics. Through such occasions his tone becomes increasingly strident, he interrupts everyone repeatedly, complains that no one has read his book, throws in a wild and dishonest claim about cannabis and mental health, then goes into full tantrum mode complaining he’s never allowed to finish his point.

He was accompanied today by David Raynes, the retired-in-disgrace, ex-customs officer who is well trained in Hitchens’ techniques. With a career one step up from a security guard, he now holds himself out as some sort of scientific and medical expert and has a ready made reefer madness story to add in while partnering with Hitchens on the interrupting, talking over and hectoring of other guests.

The moderation of the debate by Sean Fletcher was weak, ineffectual and really rather pathetic but I do sympathise.  Hitchens is a Machiavellian, calculated subverter of debate and only the very strongest can handle him.

But it’s clear that nowadays he digs himself deeper and deeper the more hysterical he becomes and the angrier he is, the more the weakness of his arguments is exposed.  Carry on Peter, you’re doing our job for us now.

Written by Peter Reynolds

September 24, 2017 at 9:51 am

Probably The Biggest Breakthrough Yet For Medicinal Cannabis In The UK.

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Peter Reynolds, President, CLEAR Cannabis Law Reform

Since the beginning of 2017, Peter Reynolds and Professor Mike Barnes of CLEAR Cannabis Law Reform have been working on a project that is about to come to fruition.  The Council of the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) meets tomorrow, 22nd September 2017, to consider our proposal to issue guidelines to doctors on the use of medicinal cannabis.

Professor Mike Barnes, Scientific & Medical Advisor, CLEAR Cannabis Law Reform

As ever, the UK’s stubborn, anti-evidence government remains intransigent on permitting legal access to cannabis, even for medicinal use.  This despite an overwhelming tide of reform across the world and the reality that perhaps one million people in the UK are criminalised and persecuted for using a medicine that has been known to be safe and effective for many centuries, facts which modern science now proves beyond doubt.

However irresponsible and pig-headed government ministers may be, doctors have a responsibility to their patients, an ethical duty that transcends the grubby and corrupt politics that ministers subscribe to. Professor Nigel Mathers, Honorary Secretary of the RCGP with responsibility for its governance, has championed CLEAR’s proposal.  He recognises that while doctors cannot be advising their patients to use an illegal drug, the reality is many people already are.

Professor Nigel Mathers, Honorary Secretary, Royal College of GPs

So this is not just another report or a conference.  This is practical action at the point of delivery of healthcare.  If the proposal is approved by the RCGP Council, the guidelines will be drafted by Professor Mike Barnes, assisted by Peter Reynolds, with additional input from the MS Society and Newcastle University.

In due course, probably by the end of the year, a booklet will be available for download by all GPs from the RCGP website.  It will set out balanced and reasonable advice on the appropriate use of cannabis for specific medical indications. The guidelines will also cover harm reduction advice and provide a basic grounding in the scientific evidence and the endocannabinoid system.

If our government refuses to take such sensible steps to improve healthcare and protect patients, then we, campaigners and medical professionals, must do it for them.

 

This Time What’s On The Side Of The Bus Is True.

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And can be backed up with solid facts and evidence.

 

 

Written by Peter Reynolds

September 14, 2017 at 11:14 am

Posted in Business, Consumerism, Health, Politics

Tagged with , ,

My Resignation From The Conservative Party.

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From: Peter Reynolds
Sent: 31 August 2017 11:20
To: ‘Chris Loder’ <chairman@westdorsetconservatives.org.uk>
Cc: ‘LETWIN, Oliver’ <oliver.letwin.mp@parliament.uk>; ‘Antony Stanley’ <agent@westdorsetconservatives.org.uk>
Subject: My resignation from the Conservative Party

 

Dear Chris,

After the disastrous handling of the EU referendum result, the ludicrous decision to appoint one of the most incompetent and out-of-touch ministers as prime minister and her farcical election performance, I have been wrestling for some time as to whether to renew my membership.  The Conservative Party is now far divorced from its fundamental principles of liberty and small government and Mrs May is an authoritarian bigot stuck in some 1950s delusion of what Britain is today.

Following her ridiculous announcement last night that she intends to stay on as leader I am now tendering my resignation forthwith.  She has no mandate, no respect and in my view is held in utter contempt throughout the country.  It is also self-evident that all other minsters are too weak, cowardly and neurotic about their own jobs to do anything to stop her.

Mrs May failed consistently over six years at the Home Office. She is a Remainer and should never have been permitted to lead the party or the country after the referendum result.  Mrs May and all ministers failed entirely to plan for a leave vote and they have dithered, waffled, dodged and tripped up again and again, achieving absolutely nothing in the period since the result.

Brexit was a huge opportunity for the UK but the Conservative Party has wrecked it and damaged Britain irreparably in the process. If I had my way Mrs May would be led in chains out of Downing Street and placed in stocks in Parliament Square to endure the humiliation she so richly deserves.

I refer you to my article ‘Has There Ever Been A Worse UK Government Than This?’ which has produced the biggest response to anything I have ever written about politics in more than 30 years of journalism.  It well sums up the tragic and diminished state in which she leaves our country.

https://peterreynolds.wordpress.com/2017/08/06/has-there-ever-been-a-worse-uk-government-than-this/

Yours sincerely,

Peter Reynolds

Written by Peter Reynolds

August 31, 2017 at 10:23 am