Peter Reynolds

The life and times of Peter Reynolds

Posts Tagged ‘Labour Party

Ignorance, Prejudice And Hypocrisy Prevail On The Labour Benches.

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Angela Eagle MP, Shadow Leader of the House of Commons; Wallasey, Labour

Angela Eagle MP, Shadow Leader of the House of Commons

“There are now just two weeks to go until the local and European elections. The Conservative party has frantically been trying to paint the Leader of the Opposition as a mixture of Karl Marx and Hugo Chávez, the UK Independence party has been hiring eastern Europeans to deliver its anti-immigration leaflets, and the Deputy Prime Minister appears to have resorted to backing a report that calls for the legalisation of cannabis. I suppose mind-altering drugs are the only thing that might persuade people to vote for him.”

Source

This from a woman who gained the distinction of becoming the British parliament’s first openly lesbian member by coming out in September 1997 in an interview with The Observer. The following year she became the first female MP to tie the knot in a civil partnership.

Another Labour Hypocrite.

Another Labour Hypocrite.

Putting aside the inter-party bickering, you would think, wouldn’t you, that someone who has bravely overcome prejudice against minorities and stood up for libertarian principles and justice, could do a little better on the cannabis issue? But no, she represents the Labour Party so well in its short sighted bigotry, intolerance and authoritarian instincts.  She fits well with the other dinosaurs; Gordon Brown, Alan Johnson, Jacqui Smith and the ignoramuses that contribute to the absence of any drugs policy at all from Labour. It’s her hypocrisy that staggers me though and I’ve seen a similar illiberal attitude from Chris Bryant, another Labour MP who has fought bravely for gay rights but is ignorance and prejudice personified on drugs policy. labour

Written by Peter Reynolds

May 9, 2014 at 11:32 am

If Two Boys Get Four Years For “Attempting” To Organise a Riot On Facebook,

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How Long Does Gerald Kaufman Get For “Attempting” To Claim £8000 For A TV?

The Daily Telegraph

By Gordon Rayner, Chief Reporter

7:00AM BST 16 May 2009

The former environment minister was asked to attend a meeting with officials from the parliamentary fees office to discuss details of another claim relating to £28,834 of work on the kitchen and bathroom at his London flat.

He told them that the work was necessary because he was “living in a slum”, though his second home, off Regent’s Park, is in one of the most fashionable areas of the capital. He was eventually reimbursed for £15,329.

On one occasion he asked a civil servant “why are you querying these expenses?” and on another threatened to make a complaint unless a dispute was settled by noon on the day in question. In one document, an official in the fees office noted that invoices Sir Gerald had submitted took him to “within 6p” of his annual limit. He also claimed £1,262 for a gas bill that was £1,055 in credit.

Between 2001 and 2008 the Manchester Gorton MP, one of the Labour party’s longest-serving members, claimed a total of £115,109 in additional costs allowances on his London flat, which he owns outright. In June 2006, he submitted a claim for three months’ expenses totalling £14,301.60, which included £8,865 for a Bang & Olufsen Beovision 40in LCD television.

Full story.

Written by Peter Reynolds

August 18, 2011 at 7:43 pm

Anti-Social Police Behaviour

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Out Of Control

The British police are out of control.  Far from becoming a politically correct “service”, they’re moving more and more towards the “force” ethos, promoting their own self-interest and resisting all attempts to be subject to democratic control.  The sooner we get elected police commissioners the better.  Those presently in charge of the police increasingly place themselves above the law and regard the public as the opposition, not the people they are paid to protect and serve.

They’re even trying to frighten us over the spending cuts, suggesting that any reduction in police budgets will lead to increased crime and disorder.  What other public service with its budget under threat uses direct fear of violence as its response?  I call that scaremongering.  I call it precious close to a protection racket, to blackmail and extortion.

The police are very, very good at road accidents.  There are brave and clever men and women in anti-terrorism and serious crime.  But we lost the British bobby sometime ago now.  I’d say it was in the 1990s.  Dixon Of Dock Green had retired to the other side of the world.  Jack Regan was supposed to have gone but he returned disguised as Gene Hunt.  The TSG continued its long tradition of brutality providing a career path for violent thugs.  The term “institutionalised racism” was coined.  The cars got faster.  The uniforms got sexier in a Nazi stormtrooper sort of way.   Meanwhile, in parallel,  the gay rights, politically correct, sociology graduates and new Labour bureaucrats gained influence and these two factions, fundamentally incompatible, consumed huge quantities of police time and procedure,  and eventually created a perfect storm of bureaucracy, corruption and laziness.  The police lost touch with the people completely.

The police don’t want to be accountable to anybody.   Even when they assault members of the public, even when innocent bystanders die at the hands of police officers in disguise, they close ranks, obstruct justice, lie, cheat and dissemble to avoid the consequences.  Now,  Sir Paul Stephenson, not content with the way his officers pervert the criminal justice system, wants some sort of immunity from the civil courts.  His secret letter to Theresa May, seeking protection against officers being sued for brutality or wrongful arrest is a disgrace.  See here. It reveals his true intentions only too clearly.  He even wants to charge for requests under the Freedom Of Information Act, further tightening the police culture of secrecy and concealment.   It is truly terrifying that Britain’s most senior police officer should even contemplate such ideas.  It is the very opposite of responsibility and conclusive proof that he is not a fit and proper person to be any sort of policeman, let alone commissioner of the Metropolitan police.  Theresa May should dismiss him immediately.   He is a power hungry, manipulative, enemy of justice.  No sort of protector or champion or servant of the public at all.

When it comes to the brutal assault by Sergeant Delroy Smellie on Nicola Fisher or the death of Ian Tomlinson, clearly caused by PC Simon Harwood, most of us would be prepared to accept the “bad apple” argument.   Yet somehow, in the Nicola Fisher case, District Judge Daphne Wickham was persuaded to refuse to hear Ms Fisher’s statement in court.  Somehow,  over a year and a half after Ian Tomlinson was killed, PC Harwood has still not been called to account for his actions and is still suspended on full pay.  Neither have his colleagues who blatantly lied and tried to cover up what had happened.  The truth is these men are not bad apples.  They are the deliberate product of the Met’s Territorial Support Group (TSG).  In hiding their identification and using brutal, disproportionate violence, they are entirely consistent with the culture and training that their senior officers have designed.

Hero

Of course, there are still good cops, selfless, conscientious heroes like PC Bill Barker who genuinely seek to serve the public.  He gave his life while protecting people during the Cumbrian floods.  See here.   He deserves every honour that we can bestow on him.  He shames all those corrupt, cowardly bullies that infect our country, that hide in their offices and cars, that display their vile and despicable attitudes on the Inspector Gadget website.   Officers like PC Barker are now in the minority, in full scale retreat, ridiculed and excluded by a wannabe Gene Hunt culture that has attracted more and more borderline psychopaths to the paramilitary uniform and fast car culture.

Role Model

Now they don’t even think that anti-social behaviour is police work.  It’s not exciting or glamorous enough.  In the early noughties in North Kensington, I saw how the police completely lost control of the Avenues, the terraced houses between the Harrow Road and Queens Park.  The police from Kilburn and Paddington Green stations were in full scale retreat, absolutely impotent and useless in the face of gangs of kids aged 10 – 16, on the streets at all hours, abusing people, keying cars, throwing eggs and laughing at any authority or discipline.   Those hooligans and yobs are now breeding and the police are reaping what they’ve sown.  I expect their solution will be violence and “fit-ups”.  They’re no different from the lowlife,  layabouts themselves.  They’re just two sides of the same coin.

Illegal Weapon

The Raoul Moat affair revealed how the police have lost the plot.   While some officers proved their courage and worth, others indulged in an orgy of technology, expense, hiding behind their procedures and precautions.  Others used banned super-Tasers, illegally obtained from their cronies in the arms industry and undoubtedly caused the death of the mad nutter.  Not a bad result but achieved in a dreadful way.  It was a dismal and demeaning epsiode for all concerned.  See here.

Corruption is endemic in the police.  It starts at the beginning of every shift and continues off duty.  At its worst, it’s the disgusting spectacle of PC Stephen Mitchell in Newcastle, who inflicted his sexual desires and drug appetite on those he arrested.  See here.  At the everyday, commonplace level, it’s the copper who confiscates a bag of weed and takes it home to smoke himself, or who brutalises a wheelchair bound medicinal cannabis user.  It’s the thugs who think it’s acceptable to terrorise and batter an old man over a motoring offence.  See here.

Elected police commissioners are our only hope.  I applaud the coalition government for bringing forward this proposal and acting on it.  I see no other way of rolling back the  Stasi-like culture that the Labour party has allowed to flourish.  Beware though, those that put themselves forward for election as a commissioners are in the front line.  They risk the attention of the police establishment in ways that we cannot yet know.  I wonder how many candidates will have their personal lives investigated and possibly fabricated?  Any prospective commissioner who wants to disrupt the comfortable life of the police may find himself in the firing line.   All sorts of inconveniences,  stops and searches, investigations and embarrassments may be just around the corner.

The police want us to believe that if they are squeezed in the spending review we will face danger, disorder and violence in the streets.  Instead, what we must do is paralyse the police bureaucracy, starve it of the resources it needs to promote its self-fulfilling prophecies and force officers back onto the streets. We will pay for shoe leather but not for air conditioned limousines.  We will support bobbies on the beat but not poseurs in flashy SUVs.   We will not tolerate any sort of discrimination or favouritism.  No officer may be a freemason or belong to any secret organsation.  We must fight for the soul and integrity of our police service against the corrupt thugs that have infiltrated it.

The British people deserve police officers they can be proud of.

Ed Miliband

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Family Trauma

I’m rather proud of the two brothers.  Be as cynical as you like, it must have been a dreadful time for both of them.  They have behaved as gentlemen, with great honour and dignity.  They have  risen above the snide provocations of the press.  I thought David’s determination to stand well clear to give Ed a clear run was a noble and sincere act.  He will return as an elder statesman.  He will become an ever more important figure in British politics.

I’m more than happy to see a new broom in Ed.  The Labour Party needs a fresh start.  I think he’ll try to be his own man.  He’ll try to shed all the baggage and forge his own path.  It’ll be interesting to see what happens.  I wish him well because I do believe that a strong opposition is a good thing. The inside information I have, from the heart of Ed’s campaign team, is that in reality he’s way to the right of David.  We’ll see!

Written by Peter Reynolds

September 30, 2010 at 8:41 am

Tony Blair With Andrew Marr

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Showdown

I have to admit I was impressed.

I do not begrudge it all.  It was fantastic, riveting television – if you’re a politics junkie like me.  I know there will be vociferous opinion against but I thought he was marvellous, quite inspiring and utterly convincing.

He always was the best possible successor to Margaret Thatcher and that shone through in the interview.  He’s explicitly not a socialist, so why he persists in the Labour Party I don’t know.  I can see why he supports the coalition.  In fact, he’d make the perfect coalition PM with Dave and Nick as his deputies!  Now there’s a thought!

I never voted for him but always rather liked him.  I confess I allowed myself to be swayed by the Bliar and anti-Blair brigade but yes, even I am susceptible to propaganda.  Recently, I have given serious attention to his involvement in the Israel Palestine dispute.  I have been deeply impressed at his even-handedness.   It is a talent to remain so impartial in such a heated and emotional situation.  It convinced me of his integrity.

That is the quality that shines through.  It is the quality that matters to me most, that I think means most of all.  He is a man of integrity.  I do not agree with him on everything by any means but…

He is a great man.

Diane Abbott. Some Integrity At Last

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It’s good to see that the Labour Party has rescued its leadership election from the very brink of irrelevance.

Diane Abbott comes from an authentic tradition of noble Labour politicians:  Tony Benn,  Michael Foot, Neil Kinnock, Ken Livingstone – these are people of integrity and valour who I mostly disagree with but who I have a deep respect for.

"I'm Oxbridge too don't you know"

If the alternatives are the oily Milliband brothers or the slippery Ed Balls then there should be no contest but I fear she cannot win.  She and Michael Portillo on “This Week” are the most balanced sofa in politics – despite ageing clubber Andrew Neil’s best efforts to caricature them.

The Milliband brothers are, of course, from the Tony Blair School Of Politics.  It’s also called “marketing”.  You don’t actually need to have any principles, you just research what the market wants and then provide it in a nice, shiny package with extra bonus points

I think that Ed Milliband will win because he still has an edge.  All the edges on his brother have been polished away.  He’s been burnished almost to Tony standards.  I could quite like Ed.  Maybe he’ll find his own voice if he’s given the chance.

Ed Balls?  As a Tory I’d love to see him as Labour leader.  It would be both entertaining and advantageous!

The Labour Leadership

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Please, not David Milliband.  He’s far, far too credible.  Not Alan Johnson either.  Apart from his catastrophe over cannabis, he’s a man I can admire.

We want Harriet Harman or Ed Balls!  The choice is delightful and makes me salivate at the very thought of either of these jokers heading up the Labour Party.  That would be the funniest thing in politics since Spitting Image!

Shusshh!  Quiet…

Vote Ed!  Vote Harriet!

Written by Peter Reynolds

May 10, 2010 at 7:43 pm

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